Tag Archives: Towed

ABC News Fixer Gets Chicago Driver Parking Ticket Justice

Photo courtesy of Tim Sturm and ABC News.

Photo courtesy of Tim Sturm and ABC News.

Even ABC News is getting into the parking ticket advice industry.

ABC News’ Stephanie Zimmerman aka The ABC News Fixer, is a reporter on consumer affairs who helps viewers solve frustrating money related problems.

Recently, Zimmerman, who’s based in New York, got a letter from a Chicago driver begging for advice on how to deal with an improperly issued parking ticket and tow.

Controversial Tow Truck Company Accused Of More llegal Hijinks

A driver accuses Rendered Services of towing his vehicle from a legal parking spot to an illegal one in order to tow it. Photo credit: Mark Schipper/DNA Info.

A driver accuses Rendered Services of towing his vehicle from a legal parking spot to an illegal one in order to tow it. Photo credit: Mark Schipper/DNA Info.

Towing company Rendered Services seems to be developing a bad reputation.

DNA Info is reporting, one driver is accusing a company tow truck driver of moving his vehicle from a legal parking spot to an illegal one before towing it to Rendered Services pound.

The vehicle owner says he parked his car on the street near his apartment and when he looked out later that evening, the car was gone.

He finally tracked it down to Rendered Service’s lot but had to pay $218 to get it back. The cashier at the yard told him his car was towed because it was parked inside a private lot.

Driver Outraged Auto Pound Uses Forklifts To Move Vehicles

FOX 32 News Chicago

One place drivers should avoid is any of Chicago’s auto pounds.

With 8000 vehicles contained within the fences of a handful of lots around the city, sometimes the pounds get over crowded. When this happens city workers will sometimes use forklifts to move cars around.

One woman was so shocked and outraged when she saw her impounded car being moved via forklift at an auto pound, she complained to Fox News Chicago.

Parking 101: How To Keep Tow Trucks From Towing Your Car

Photo credit: Tony Marengo/YouTube via DNA Info.

Photo credit: Tony Marengo/YouTube via DNA Info.

That video portraying the daring getaway of a Jeep owner escaping the hook and thwarting a tow truck’s attempt to tow it away has been all over the news the past week or so.

Which makes it a good excuse to discuss tips on preventing your vehicle from being towed.

First, don’t be stupid.

What we mean is, don’t park in places where there’s the possibility of being towed.

City’s Winter Overnight Parking Ban Starts At 3 AM Monday

Chicago Winter Overnight Parking Ban SignIt’s that time of year again.

Every December 1st, hundreds of drivers will be surprised to find their car has mysteriously disappeared overnight.

No, their vehicle hasn’t been stolen or repossessed but towed away by city tow trucks for violating the city’s annual Winter Overnight Parking Ban which starts at 3 AM on Monday, December 1st.

The ban effects 107 miles of what the city considers “critical arterial streets” from December 1st and April 1st each year and is in effect between the hours of 3 AM and 7 AM each early morning–regardless of snow on the ground.

Car owners will have to pay a minimum $150 towing fee, $20 storage fee per day to get their car released from the city auto pound and still have to pay a $60 parking ticket. Towed vehicles will be brought to either Auto Pound 2 located at 10301 S. Doty or Auto Pound 2 located at 701 N. Sacramento.

New Year’s Eve Reveler’s Spend New Year’s Day At Auto Pound

A towed vehicle exits the Auto Pound at 701 N. Sacramento last year after the first night of Winter Overnight Parking Ban.

A towed vehicle exits the Auto Pound at 701 N. Sacramento last year after the first night of Winter Overnight Parking Ban.

Talk about a hangover.

According to RedEye, 64 vehicles were towed on New Year’s Eve due to the city’s Winter Overnight Parking Ban which runs from December 1st to April 1st every early morning between 3 AM and 7 AM.

Drivers, who after celebrating the New Year at a club, bar, or restaurant to find their car had disappeared got to continue in their revelry at one of Chicago’s auto pounds to recover their vehicle. The tow will cost the car owner a minimum $150 tow fee, $20 storage fee and $50 ticket for a grand total of $220.

What a wonderful way to ring in the New Year!

Read the full story at RedEy, “More than 60 cars towed New Year’s Day for parking violation.”

Tow Trucks Get Big Haul On First Night Of Winter Parking Ban

A tow truck is set to tow a car off Milwaukee Avenue early Sunday morning on the first day of the city's annual Winter Overnight Parking Ban.

They came by car, by taxi and some by foot.

Drivers who had cars towed on the first night of the city’s annual Winter Overnight Parking Ban arrived at City Auto Pound #6 at 701 N. Sacramento Ave., angry, frustrated and tired early Sunday morning to retrieve their cars.

Aurora Ramierez and her husband traveled to the pound by taxi with their two young children, ages 2 and 7 in tow, both still dressed in their pajamas underneath winter coats.

“It was at 6:10 in the morning, we heard four knocks on the door but by the time we went outside the car was gone,” said Ramierez who lives on West Division Street. “The sign says if there’s 2 inches of snow…they could be more specific.”

It was an expensive mistake for towed drivers who were hit with a $150 tow fee, $20 per day in storage fees and a $60 parking ticket.

Read more at DNA Info Chicago.

Winter Parking Ban Starts Early Sunday, Record Total of Cars Could Be Towed

A towed vehicle exits the Auto Pound at 701 N. Sacramento last year after the first night of Winter Overnight Parking Ban.

Record numbers of drivers could have a rude awakening Sunday morning when the city’s annual Winter Overnight Parking Ban starts.

That’s because the ban begins on a weekend this year, just like it did last year when far more cars were towed on the first two nights of the ban than during any year since 2007, including many revelers out for a night at the bars. While city officials couldn’t say for sure, they believed the two-day opening total was a record number.

But this year there could be even more unhappy drivers, city officials acknowledge, for two reasons:

• With the ban starting at 3 a.m. Sunday, at the end of the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, many visitors from out of town might be unfamiliar with the prohibition on parking on 107 miles of arterial streets, which runs till 7 a.m. daily from Dec. 1-April 1. The ban is a precautionary measure in case the city needs to plow the streets after a snowfall, but it remains in effect even if it doesn’t snow.

• The city started offering free parking at metered spots in most neighborhoods on Sundays earlier this year, which has led many people to simply leave their cars parked from late Saturday to early Monday, many business officials said.

Read more at DNA Info Chicago.

Early Warning, Winter Overnight Parking Ban Starts This Weekend

Drivers beware!

Chicago’s annual Winter Overnight Parking Ban kicks off late Saturday night or more accurately early Sunday morning, December 1st at 3 AM on 107 miles of arterial streets.

The ban runs every night from December 1st to April 1st from 3 AM to 7 AM whether there’s snow on the pavement or not.

The city claims these critical thoroughfares must be kept car-free in case of an overnight snow storm as parked cars prevents plows from quickly and efficiently clearing streets if a major snow storm strikes.

Department of Streets and Sanitation crews have been flyering cars parked on streets along the ban route and are reminding drivers to read and obey the posted signs.

Israeli Woman Gets Justice After Being Unjustly Towed

Hila Ben-Baruch couldn’t believe it.

The Israeli student came back to where she parked her car on a Tel Aviv street and it was gone. Not only that, the space where her car was parked was now a handicapped space–but it wasn’t one when she originally parked.

Ben-Baruch tracked her car down. It turns out it was ticketed and towed. The fine was nearly $300.

Now she was really mad.