Tag Archives: Chicago parking meters

Paid Sunday Metered Parking Returns To Lakeview

A sticker on the front of meter payboxes in Lakeview remind drivers they now have to pay to park on Sundays.

A sticker on the front of meter payboxes in Lakeview remind drivers they now have to pay to park on Sundays.

It took over a year, but 44th Ward Alderman Tom Tunney finally was able to restore paid metered parking to Lakeview on Sundays.

Drivers had to start paying the meters Sunday, September 28th at metered parking spaces on major streets like Clark, Halsted, Broadway, Belmont,  Southport and others from 10 AM until 8 PM.  Monday through Saturday meters must be fed from 8 AM until 10 PM in most areas.

The alderman told DNA Info a few weeks ago, the move was necessary to promote turnover of parking spaces to allow more people to find parking to shop in Lakeview.

“Saturday and Sunday are the No. 1 and 2 days of economic activity in the ward,” Tunney said. “We need the turnover specifically on those busiest days.

Fox Chicago News, Other Media Outlets Cover ParkChicago Story

FOX 32 News Chicago

Fox Chicago News and a bevy of other media outlets picked up on The Expired Meter’s story on the issues with ParkChicago users getting ticketed while paid up using the app.

Newsradio 780′s Nancy Harty also had a short radio report as well.

Parking Meter App Users Wrongly Ticketed Hundreds of Times

Workers for CPM erect one of the 42,000 signs needed citywide for the ParkChicago mobile pay to park system.

Workers for CPM erect one of the 42,000 signs needed citywide for the ParkChicago mobile pay to park system.

The city’s highly touted new pay-by-phone parking meter app is being rolled out across the city, but hundreds of drivers have been ticketed even after correctly using the app to pay their meters.

City officials confirm that 317 drivers using the recently released ParkChicago pay-by-phone app have reported receiving tickets for an expired-meter violation — even though there was still time on the meter — in the first two months since the app’s rollout began in May.

Chicago Parking Meters spokesman Scott Burnham said only a small percentage of parkers who used the app have gotten tickets, although he didn’t say how many times the app had been used overall to pay meters.

The city has issued 81,868 expired-meter tickets to all parkers citywide since the app became available, although most of those went to parkers using the pay boxes on the street.

The ParkChicago app debuted to great fanfare in a West Loop pilot test in mid-April. It allows drivers to use their Android or iOS smartphones to pay their parking meter without having to walk to the parking meter paybox.

Read more at DNA Info Chicago.

Chicago Tribune Rehashes Website’s Reporting On Savings From Revised Meter Lease Deal

meterfail600In an awesome job of re-reporting a story reported by The Expired Meter two months ago, the Chicago Tribune recently published a piece breaking down numbers which shows the city is paying less to Chicago Parking Meters, LLC than it had previously.

Again, as originally reported back in May, Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s administration renegotiated the much criticized parking meter lease deal signed by Mayor Richard Daley in 2008. Under the revised deal, numbers seem to indicate that payments made to CPM for temporary meter closures, metered spaces taken out of service and other events reducing the value of the metered parking system have been drastically reduced.

Bills which topped $53 million in one year, are now just over $6 million a year.

Appellate Court Upholds Chicago’s Parking Meter Lease Deal

meter-fail-2After fighting a five-year uphill legal battle, a state appellate court has upheld the legality of Chicago’s infamous parking meter lease deal according to the Chicago Reader.

The lawsuit, filed by attorney Clint Krislov on behalf of the IVI-IPO, challenged the state constitutionality of the 2008 deal.

Krislov main argument was that the “True-up” payments the city has to pay Chicago Parking Meters, LLC, any time the city has to make changes to the public way that affects meter revenue is a de facto surrender of the city’s police powers.

But, despite the judge’s sympathy with Krislov on how bad the deal is for the city, they say that’s not enough to reverse the deal.

The Reader quotes the June 20th decision which says:

Professor Discovers Even More Problems With Parking Meter Deal

An old school parking meter from before the notorious Chicago parking meter lease came into being in 2008 adds its two cents.

An old school parking meter from before the notorious Chicago parking meter lease came into being in 2008 adds its two cents on the issue.

It’s hard to believe the infamous 2008 parking meter lease deal could continue to become an even larger failure than it already is. However, according to a local academic the meter deal continues to surpass everyone’s expectations of what’s already considered a fiasco.

Roosevelt University professor of sociology Stephanie Farmer was curious to know how the meter lease deal affected what she termed “street-level planning”, so she interviewed local transportation planners.

Farmer recently published some of her findings at Next City and what her research indicates is that the meter lease deal is making it difficult and potentially very expensive for Chicago to make significant changes and/or improvements to city streets.

Illinois Appellate Court Hears Parking Meter Lawsuit Arguments

meterfail600The wheels of justice turn very, very slowly.

That’s why, despite being originally filed in 2009, the lawsuit challenging the state constitutionality of Chicago’s 2008 parking meter lease deal is just now being considered by the Illinois Appellate Court in 2014.

According to Chicago Reader reporter Mick Dumke who was at court Thursday, a three-judge panel heard oral arguments from lead attorney Clint Krislov on behalf of the IVI-IPO on Thursday. Krislov argued the city turned over its “police powers” to Chicago Parking Meters, LLC thus giving up its ability to effectively regulate parking, traffic and the public way. This is something at odds with the Illinois state constitution according to Krislov.

Over 15,000 Drivers Sign Up For ParkChicago App

When you start seeing signs like this around areas you park, you can start using the ParkChicago app.

When you start seeing signs like this around areas you park, you can start using the ParkChicago app.

In just a few weeks after the city wide expansion of its service began, over 15,000 drivers have signed up to use the ParkChicago mobile payment app according to Chicago Parking Meters, LLC.

ParkChicago is the pay-by-phone app that allows Chicago motorists to pay for metered parking remotely via their smartphone remotely, instead of having to feed the meter.

CPM launched the service with a three-week pilot test confined to a four block area in the West Loop neighborhood back in mid-April and then started the expansion the first week in May.

“The response to ParkChicago has been very positive as you can tell by the number of drivers who have signed up in just a short amount of time,” said CPM spokesperson Scott Burnham. “Our customers obviously like the ease and convenience of the app, which allows them to avoid a trip to the meter box and eliminates the need of having to walk back to their vehicle to place a parking receipt on their dashboard. It also gives them added flexibility by enabling them to extend their time remotely so they don’t have to rush to get back before their time expires.”

Parking Meter Deal Revisions Saving City Tens of Millions of Dollars: City

Parking Meter taxesMayor Rahm Emanuel’s revision of the controversial parking meter deal is saving the city tens of millions of dollars, figures released by the mayor’s office show.

Meanwhile, a change in state law that greatly limited which disabled drivers can park for free at the meters could also save the city a bundle, city officials say.

According to data based on audited financial statements filed by Chicago Parking Meters late last week, the amount of money the city must pay the meter operator when meters are taken out of commission — known as “true up” payments — has dropped dramatically since the revised deal went into effect last June.

Since that time, the city paid CPM $6.6 million in “true up” payments, or an average of $1.65 million per quarter.

In the five quarters preceding the revised deal, the payments averaged $10.2 million per quarter.

Read more at DNA Info Chicago.

Meter Company Begins Citywide Expansion Of Pay By Phone System

Workers for CPM erect one of the 42,000 signs needed citywide for the ParkChicago mobile pay to park system.

Workers for CPM erect one of the 42,000 signs needed citywide for the ParkChicago mobile pay to park system.

Tuesday morning in the South Loop, workers for Chicago Parking Meters, LLC began erecting the new signs heralding the citywide expansion of the new ParkChicago mobile parking payment system.

The company just completed a successful pilot test of the app in a four block area of the West Loop where the company saw more than 3,500 people download the ParkChicago app and 1,600 drivers sign up to use it.

The rollout will expand outward from areas adjacent to the pilot area to the rest of the 36,000 metered spaces citywide. Workers will need several months to replace the approximately 42,000 signs with new ones which instruct drivers on how to use the new system. The city and CPM promise ParkChicago will be available everywhere by the end of the summer but hope it’s finished sooner.

“We launched the pilot to garner feedback from the public, and the response from
drivers and local businesses has been very positive,” said CPM’s CEO Dennis Pedrelli. “We look forward to introducing this new service to residents, commuters and visitors around the city, as we continue to seek out new ways to improve the parking experience in Chicago.”