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Category Archives: Traffic Tickets

“Sign & Drive” Bill Becomes Law With Governor’s Signature

Driver's  licenseMotorists ticketed by police officers for minor traffic citations can say goodbye to having to give up their driver’s license as bond with a new law signed by Governor Pat Quinn Sunday.

Called the “Sign and Drive” law, it ends the long practice of drivers having to post their license as insurance they show up in traffic court or pay the fine for a traffic ticket by allowing them to simply sign their signature on the citation.

“A driver’s license is an important form of identification, and without it many residents may run into problems during everyday situations when a valid ID is required,” Quinn said. “This common sense legislation will allow law enforcement officials to continue doing their jobs while letting motorists hang onto a vital piece of identification. ‘Sign and Drive’ will help ensure motorists comply with the law and keep traffic moving on our streets.”

Governor Quinn Signs Law Banning Police Ticket Quotas

Uh-OhDo police ticket quotas really exist?

Governor Pat Quinn seem to think so.

He signed legislation Sunday which prohibits municipal and county governments from requiring police officers to meet a set number of traffic tickets they must issue within a certain time period–in other words–a quota.

The law not only bans quotas but prevents them from being used by a town to evaluate officer performance in annual employment reviews.

A Traffic Ticket Story For Christmas Time

We’re suckers for a good heartwarming story–especially this time of year.

This one involves a young father, struggling to make ends meet in a rough economy, who gets pulled over for having an expired vehicle registration.

The driver explains what happens next to the local CBS affiliate in Plano, Texas.

Part 3: Fighting Traffic Tickets Can Be Fun?

The Step by Step Process In Fighting A Traffic Ticket

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is part 3 of a multi-part series following the Parking Ticket Geek’s recent adventures in trying to fight a Chicago traffic ticket.

In Part 1 of the series, the Geek gets pulled over for allegedly making an illegal left turn.

Then, in Part 2 of the series, the Geek goes back to the “scene of the crime” to check out the intersection environment to see if if there’s enough evidence to use as the basis of a defense and find out some very interesting things.

PART 3: Preparing The Case

A few months after I had requested my day in court, I had still had not heard anything from the office of Dorothy Brown, the Clerk of Cook County Circuit Court. No postcard, letter or correspondence. I was mildly concerned.

So I called the Clerk’s office to see if they had received my request in the mail. I had taken the extra step and sent my request by certified mail just to insure that I had documentation to prove I had actually mailed it.

There is a way to request a hearing via the Clerk’s website, but I opted to go with the tried but true USPS. Perhaps that was a mistake.

After a few calls I finally got through to someone who told me my court date was in three days.

This might be a problem.

Fighting Traffic Tickets Can Be Fun?

Fighting  Traffic Tickets Step By Step

EDITOR’S NOTE: Part one of a multi-part series following the Parking Ticket Geek’s recent adventures in trying to fight a Chicago traffic ticket.

It’s rare I get traffic tickets.

While my problem has always been with the tickets you get when the car is not in motion, my reasonably safe driving habits have kept my moving violations to a minimum over the course of my three decade career as a licensed driver.

But, when you drive as much as I do the odds will eventually catch up with you.

That’s exactly what happened in late spring.

Driving on the Northside, heading west on Bryn Mawr, I approached Broadway and tried to take a left.

Laying in wait, parked on the opposite side of the intersection, a Chicago Police Department SUV flashed its lights and hit the siren as I went to make my turn.

Physicist Uses Mathematics To Beat $400 Traffic Ticket

Remember when you were back in school and questioned how the math you were learning would help you in the “real world”?

Well, one physicist from the University of California-San Diego, used his mathematics and science background to convince a judge that the police had erred when they issued him a $400 ticket for failing to make a complete stop at a stop sign.

According to the Physics Buzz Blog, Dmitri Krioukov, after receiving a traffic ticket for allegedly blowing the stop sign, he wrote a four page paper outlining the three physical phenomena which misled the cops to “believe” he had broken the law.

Here’s how Physics Buzz breaks it down.

To Avoid Ticket, Driver Tries To Rundown Cops

Running over a policeman is never a good idea.

Even if it’s to avoid receiving a traffic ticket.

Ironically, an employee for Allstate Insurance was arrested for striking a police officer after she was pulled over in her Corvette on North Michigan Ave. Saturday after pulling a U-turn while observed talking on her cell phone according to the Chicago Tribune. Before police officers on bikes could issue her traffic citations, she backed into one officer and left the scene.