Chicago Expands Hardship Eligibility For Parking Ticket Payment Plans

daley_photo.jpg

I don’t know how I missed this, but back in March, the Chicago city council voted to expand the parameters of “hardship eligibility,” for parking ticket payment plans, to include anyone whose home is in foreclosure.

I’m impressed that the mayor and the city council recognize that the economy, and home mortgage problem has put some additional financial pressure on some of our fine citizens. But maybe they just realize they would perhaps NEVER get paid if someone loses their home and perhaps goes into bankruptcy.

I mean, isn’t the first thought that pops into someone’s mind, when one is losing their home, their entire world is spiraling into oblivion and the sheriff shows up with an eviction notice is, “I need to rush downtown and setup a payment plan for all my parking tickets! Gee, thanks for looking out for me Mayor Daley!!!”

Perhaps the mayor and the city council will recognize that all the increased taxes, and fees they voted for, are going to drive everyone in the city into bankruptcy. Maybe they will further expand hardship eligibility for idiots like myself who are just broke all the time. Or perhaps, for everyone in the city who is being taxed into bankruptcy by Todd Stroger and his Cook County cronies.

If you owe the city a lot of money for parking tickets and/or red light violations, you might want to look into parking ticket and red light ticket payment plans.

Here is the press release.

City Council Approves Expansion of Hardship Eligibility for Parking Ticket Payment Plans

New Hardship Eligibility Assists Motorists Experiencing Home Foreclosure

The City Council today passed an ordinance proposed by Mayor Richard M. Daley to expand hardship eligibility for parking and red-light ticket payment plans. Eligibility for the hardship plan now includes motorists in home foreclosure. According to the Chicago Department of Housing, 14,250 foreclosures were initiated in the City for 2007 alone.In late 2007, hardship eligibility was expanded to include persons in active and reservist military duty and the term was lengthened for those unable to pay within one year.”The plans allow motorists to pay off debt over a longer period of time,” said Mayor Daley. “The hardship payment plan offers the most flexible payment terms to motorists with the greatest financial need. Homeowners experiencing home foreclosure are now eligible to benefit from this plan.”

Approximately 31 percent of all payment plans in 2007 were special or hardship plans, providing special terms and assistance to eligible motorists. The further expansion in eligibility will not only assist motorists in need, but also makes sense from a collections perspective. Since inception of the plans in 2004, 216,000 plans have helped to collect $123 million in parking and red-light ticket revenue.

Current hardship eligibility categories include seniors, age 65 and older, students, and persons receiving government issued unemployment benefits. For additional hardship eligibility categories and general information on ticket payment plans, visit cityofchicago.org/revenue or call 312.744.PARK (7275)

4 Responses to Chicago Expands Hardship Eligibility For Parking Ticket Payment Plans

  1. Rev Rotunda says:

    The down payment required by the Dept. of Revenue’s parking ticket payment plan is outrageous–it constitutes of the equivalent of one paycheck there-by one would have to obtain a loan in order to secure it. Granted, the money is owed even though over half of the parking tickets issued are erroneous and one is too pressed for time to have a hearing in a timely manner. Even with a hearing, since you guys need the money so badly, the hearing officer is geared to making sure you lose your case. And what’s the point of doubling the original violation amount? That is high-way robbery & totally unnecessary for the citizen. Since you guys are demanding all this extra money to help control the deficit, you can at least offer a reasonable down payment–it should be a flat $250.00 for hardship & a flat $500 for non-hardship cases. Who can afford these percentages that you have set up? It’s not reasonable. One thing to keep in mind that you guys obviously don’t care about is that not all people who end up owing these fines are bad people.

  2. WILLIAM ARRINGTON says:

    I AM A JUST IN A OUTRAGE..HOW IS IT THAT THIS CITY CAN TELL YOU HOW MUCH MONEY YOU GOT TO PUT DOWN ON TICKET FOR PLATES THAT YOU DIDNT HAVE IN YOUR NAME IN THE FIRST PLACE,AND I HAVE TO PROVE THAT THE DAM PLATE ISNT MINE..I COULD GO OWN BUT WHO GIVES A DAM.

  3. Capt M-Plate says:

    Bill,

    If the plate isn’t yours, there is a possibility that someone with your name (it does happen that there are more than 1 person in this country with the same first and last name) is the person that owns the plate in question.

    More information is going to be needed to help you figure this out though.

  4. brittany says:

    One u put a percent do u get lincense back?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>